On 15 October 2012 12:51, Dmytro Guzenko <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:Dmytro.Guzenko@pharm.kuleuven.be" target="_blank">Dmytro.Guzenko@pharm.kuleuven.be</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">







<div lang="NL-BE" link="blue" vlink="purple">
<div>
<p class="MsoNormal">On a related note  is there a way to debug the python code of cctbx and step into the c++ code? Debugging is my favorite way to figure things out, but with cctbx most interesting things are hidden. I am using Eclipse
 + PyDev now.</p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><br></p></div></div></blockquote><div>I have done this successfully using WingIDE+Visual Studio on Windows and WingIDE+Xcode on Mac. First you will need a debug build of the cctbx, which you can get by adding --build=debug to the libtbx.configure options and recompiling. Then you need to first stop at a breakpoint in your Python debugger, then in your C++ debugger you need to find the &quot;Attach to Process&quot; (or similar) option in the menu and find the current Python process to attach to. Then when you step through your Python debugger then any C++ breakpoints should be caught in your C++ debugger.</div>

<div><br></div><div>Hope that helps,</div><div><br></div><div>Richard</div></div>