<html dir="ltr">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=gb2312">
</head>
<body fpstyle="1" ocsi="0">
<div style="direction: ltr;font-family: Tahoma;color: #000000;font-size: 10pt;">You could try both the isomorphous and the anomalous differences. &nbsp;Each one has some useful information. You can even combine them but I'm guessing it won't help too much.&nbsp;
<div><br>
</div>
<div>Paul Adams' suggestion to check out related space groups is a very good one. Phenix.autosol only tries the opposite hand, so you have to try all the different screw axis possibilities that are not related by inversion.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>Another thing you could try is to repeat your MR with density from your map (against the 2.6 A native) and get a long list of solutions. For each solution take the phases after MR and use them to calculate an anomalous difference Fourier for your semet
 P2221 data. &nbsp;Then notice if there are peaks in this map, and whether these peaks have the same relationship to the MR-placed density as you saw in your original map. &nbsp;If yes, you may have a solution.<br>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>
<div>All the best,</div>
<div>Tom T</div>
<div><br>
<div style="font-family: Times New Roman; color: #000000; font-size: 16px">
<hr tabindex="-1">
<div id="divRpF878764" style="direction: ltr; "><font face="Tahoma" size="2" color="#000000"><b>From:</b> phenixbb-bounces@phenix-online.org [phenixbb-bounces@phenix-online.org] on behalf of zhaoy [zhaoy@moon.ibp.ac.cn]<br>
<b>Sent:</b> Sunday, June 23, 2013 3:32 PM<br>
<b>To:</b> PHENIX user mailing list<br>
<b>Subject:</b> Re: [phenixbb] what about heavy atom as model for MR<br>
</font><br>
</div>
<div></div>
<div>
<p>Thank you very much.&nbsp; I will try as you said. </p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>The P2221 dataset's qulity are not very well. The points from diffraction image are not sharp. Besides, native dataset is 2.6A, setmet anomalous datasets is only 4A. So I have not obtained the solution with p2221datasets.</p>
<p>There is only one molecular&nbsp;per AUS at p4322. So, from the initial map, I can confirm the&nbsp;heavy atom sites&nbsp;from the same molecular.<br>
</p>
<p>Maybe I have a general idea about the method you said. But I still puzzled which F difference should I use, isomorphous or anomalous differences?</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>Thanks!</p>
<div>--<br>
<br>
<font color="#127db8">Yan Zhao, M.Phil.<br>
National Laboratory of Protein Sciences <br>
Institute of Biophysics <br>
Chinese Academy of Sciences <br>
15 Datun Rd.<br>
Beijing, 100101 <br>
China </font></div>
<style id="owaParaStyle" type="text/css"></style>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<blockquote style="border-left:#000000 2px solid; padding-left:5px; padding-right:0px; margin-left:5px; margin-right:0px">
<div>Terwilliger, Thomas C д:</div>
<div style="font-family:Tahoma; direction:ltr; color:#000000; font-size:10pt">I'm not sure if there is a tool that will create the file you want for this. &nbsp;You could however just write a little script that reads in a .sca file and calculates F from I, subtract
 F&#43; - F- to get Dano, square that, write out Dano**2 and sigma(Dano**2) as another .sca file. &nbsp;Then you could use this as input to molecular replacement with your sites from the P4322 dataset.&nbsp;
<div><br>
</div>
<div>There is an important caveat to this approach however: &nbsp;your sites from the P4322 have to be all part of the same molecule, and this might or might not happen automatically. &nbsp;If some sites are from one molecule and others from another molecule, then in
 the other crystal form their relationship won't be correct. &nbsp;If there is only one molecule in the au then this might or might not be a big problem. If there are more than one it is very likely to be a big problem. &nbsp; This would apply to the density search that
 you carried out as well. &nbsp;If your density is good enough to see where the molecule is, you might be able to figure out which of the symmetry-related sites to include in your MR search.
<div><br>
</div>
<div>Nevertheless as this is easy it seems like a fine thing to do. &nbsp;However I am wondering if it will work because your 2.6 A semet anomalous dataset did not yield a solution by itself, which is a little surprising... &nbsp;Also of course if your P4322 solution
 is not actually right or even just not close enough it would not work.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>-Tom T</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>
<div style="font-family:Times New Roman; color:#000000; font-size:16px">
<hr tabindex="-1">
<div id="divRpF533395" style="direction:ltr"><font color="#000000" size="2" face="Tahoma"><b>From:</b> phenixbb-bounces@phenix-online.org [phenixbb-bounces@phenix-online.org] on behalf of  [zhaoy@moon.ibp.ac.cn]<br>
<b>Sent:</b> Sunday, June 23, 2013 7:52 AM<br>
<b>To:</b> phenixbb@phenix-online.org<br>
<b>Subject:</b> [phenixbb] what about heavy atom as model for MR<br>
</font><br>
</div>
<div></div>
<div>
<p>Hi everyone,</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>The heavy atoms(Se-Met) were located at P4322 space group(4A). But the initial density map is so bad that I can not build the initial model.
</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>Meanwhile, I have another&nbsp;two datasets, native(2.6A) and&nbsp;&nbsp;se-met anomalous dataset with space group P2221. But these two datasets have no solution. I have tried the initial map from sp P4322 as a model to do molecular &nbsp;replacement. But no MR solution.&nbsp;<br>
<br>
So, I want to know how can I use the heavy atom as model to do MR with isomorphous or anomalous differences?</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>Thanks!<br>
</p>
<div>--<br>
<br>
<font color="#127db8">Yan Zhao, M.Phil.<br>
National Laboratory of Protein Sciences <br>
Institute of Biophysics <br>
Chinese Academy of Sciences <br>
15 Datun Rd.<br>
Beijing, 100101 <br>
China </font></div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</blockquote>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>