<div dir="ltr">Phil, the Br is in ligand, as you suggest, I might just see weak anomalous.<div><br></div><div>Ryan, you are right. I have no evidence to show the Br-ligand I used is in the protein structure.</div><div><br>
</div><div>resolution does not degrade much along with frames</div><div><br></div><div>I think this is just a weak anomalous signal datasets.</div><div><br></div><div>Thanks.</div><div><br></div><div>Charles</div><div><br>
</div><div><br></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Jul 10, 2014 at 1:03 PM, Phil Jeffrey <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:pjeffrey@princeton.edu" target="_blank">pjeffrey@princeton.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Charles,<br>
<br>
So if you have bound ligand with a covalently-linked Bromine, and the ligand isn&#39;t abundant in your unit cell, don&#39;t you *expect* the anomalous signal to be weak ? ┬áHave you tried a DANO model-phased difference map or something comparable ?<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><br>

<br>
Phil Jeffrey<br>
Princeton</font></span><div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br>
<br>
On 7/10/14 12:52 PM, CPMAS Chen wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Well, let me make this clear.<br>
<br>
1. I am using Br anomalous signal to identify the potentially bound ligand.<br>
2. I do shoot the crystals at 0.92A.<br>
3. the different crystals have different resolution, but anomalous<br>
signal was weak as reported by autoxds.<br>
<br>
Charles<br>
</blockquote>
<br>
<br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br>







<p></p><p>***************************************************</p><p>Charles Chen</p><p>Research Associate</p><p>University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine</p><p>Department of Anesthesiology</p><p>******************************************************</p>
<p></p>
</div>