<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=windows-1252"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <br>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 10/27/14 4:43 PM, Nathaniel Echols
      wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CALeAa1MapZosx+898mrWJ8gudT9hhYgQ4jZYpWr64Z7wLwTLmQ@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">
      <div dir="ltr">On Mon, Oct 27, 2014 at 1:19 PM, George
        Devaniranjan <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a moz-do-not-send="true"
            href="mailto:devaniranjan@gmail.com" target="_blank">devaniranjan@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span>
        wrote:<br>
        <div class="gmail_extra">
          <div class="gmail_quote">
            <blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px
0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">
              <div dir="ltr">
                <div>Would you define "significant" for me (as you see
                  it of course)?</div>
              </div>
            </blockquote>
            <div><br>
            </div>
            <div>Pavel's definition:</div>
            <div><br>
            </div>
            <div><a moz-do-not-send="true"
                href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2906258/">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2906258/</a><br>
            </div>
            <div><br>
            </div>
            <div>"...the difference between R factors computed using the
              different methods is typically less than 0.01%."</div>
            <div><br>
            </div>
            <div>I think this is probably a typo and it is supposed to
              mean "1%" or "0.01", which would have been my estimate. 
              Certainly differences below 0.005 are hardly worth
              noticing, and below 0.001 is statistical noise. 
              Differences above 0.01 are more worrisome (although not
              entirely unheard of).<br>
            </div>
          </div>
        </div>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    It depends what you compare and how.. Two scenarios:<br>
    <br>
    1) Compute Fcalc using FFT (Fc_fft) and direct summation (Fc_direct)
    and compute R-factor(Fc_fft, Fc_direct). In this case indeed
    typically the R-factor will be below 1% (not 0.01% !). Attached
    script illustrates this (to run: phenix.python run.py).<br>
    Also, Table 4 in<br>
    <br>
    Acta Cryst. (2004). A60, 19-32.<br>
    On a fast calculation of structure factors at a subatomic resolution<br>
    P. V. Afonine and A. Urzhumtsev<br>
    <br>
    does exactly this comparison.<br>
    <br>
    2) You run two identical refinements, in one you use FFT and in the
    other one direct summation. In this case the difference between
    R-factors is likely to be below 0.01%. This is because refinable
    parameters will absorb the differences.<br>
    <br>
    Pavel<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>