<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=windows-1252"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    Hello Smith,<br>
    <br>
    <blockquote
cite="mid:61917642.1644751.1421551267766.JavaMail.yahoo@jws10069.mail.ne1.yahoo.com"
      type="cite">
      <div style="color:#000; background-color:#fff;
        font-family:HelveticaNeue, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, Arial,
        Lucida Grande, sans-serif;font-size:16px">In the X-ray
        statistics by resolution bin of the Phenix.refine result, there
        is a column "%complete".  For my refinement data, I find the
        better the resolution (from lower resolution to the higher
        resolution), the lower the completeness (for example for 40-6 A,
        %complete is 98, for 3.1-3.0 A, %complete is 60%, for 2.2-2.1 A,
         %complete is  6%).
        <div id="yui_3_16_0_1_1421549604340_5528" class="" style=""><br
            class="" style="">
        </div>
        <div id="yui_3_16_0_1_1421549604340_5528" class="" style="">Will
          you please tell me what does this "%complete" mean? why it
          decreases in the better diffraction bin?</div>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    Completeness is how many reflections you have compared to
    theoretically possible. So the higher completeness the better.
    Ideally (and it's not that uncommon these days) you should have 100%
    complete data set in d_min-inf resolution. Anything below say 80 in
    any resolution bin is bad, and numbers you quote 6-60% mean
    something is wrong withe the dataset.<br>
    <br>
    <blockquote
cite="mid:61917642.1644751.1421551267766.JavaMail.yahoo@jws10069.mail.ne1.yahoo.com"
      type="cite">
      <div style="color:#000; background-color:#fff;
        font-family:HelveticaNeue, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, Arial,
        Lucida Grande, sans-serif;font-size:16px">
        <div id="yui_3_16_0_1_1421549604340_5528" class="" style="">For
          the Ramachandran restrain in the Phenix.refine, there was a
          recommendation that for good resolution (I forget how much
          exactly, maybe 2.5 A), do not use Ramachandran restrain. </div>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    True.<br>
    <br>
    <blockquote
cite="mid:61917642.1644751.1421551267766.JavaMail.yahoo@jws10069.mail.ne1.yahoo.com"
      type="cite">
      <div style="color:#000; background-color:#fff;
        font-family:HelveticaNeue, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, Arial,
        Lucida Grande, sans-serif;font-size:16px">
        <div id="yui_3_16_0_1_1421549604340_5528" class="" style="">But
          for a crystal data with resolution better than 1.5 A, in the
          X-ray statistics by resolution bin of the Phenix.refine
          result, there are more rows with resolution poorer than the
          defined 2.5 A (for example 40-6 A,6-3 A), although the crystal
          has a resolution better than 1.5 A (for example 1.4 A), can I
          use Ramachandran restrain in the Phenix.refine in this
          situation?</div>
        <div id="yui_3_16_0_1_1421549604340_5528" class="" style=""><br
            class="" style="">
        </div>
        <div id="yui_3_16_0_1_1421549604340_5528" class="" style="">If I
          use Ramachandran restrain in the Phenix.refine, I find the
          R-work and R-free level goes up, can we say the strategy of
          Ramachandran restrain in my refinement was not appropriate?<br>
        </div>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    A situation when using Ramachandran restraints may be useful starts
    at approximately 3A resolution and lower. Also note, Ramachandran
    restraints may only be used to prevent Ramachandran plot outliers,
    not fix them. And if you use these restraints to fix Ramachandran
    plot outliers (for example, when there are too many so that manual
    fixing is not practical), then make sure all fixed outliers make
    sense.<br>
    <br>
    Pavel<br>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>